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Wednesday, July 29, 2020 | History

2 edition of St. Ninian, bishop of Candida Casa. found in the catalog.

St. Ninian, bishop of Candida Casa.

Mark Pattison

St. Ninian, bishop of Candida Casa.

by Mark Pattison

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Published by J. Toovey in London .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Ninian, -- Saint, -- d. 432?

  • Edition Notes

    With: St. Aelred, abbot of Rievaux. London, 1845.

    SeriesLives of the English saints -- no. 13
    The Physical Object
    Paginationvi, 148 p. ;
    Number of Pages148
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL18243862M

      St Ninian, Bishop & Confessor: Missa stone, the town, according to Bede and Malmesbury, took from this edifice its name (importing a white house, in Latin Candida Casa) since changed into Whithern. The saint fixed here his episcopal see, and dedicated the church in honour of St. Martin, whose tomb he probably had devoutly visited in his.   Bishop and confessor; date of birth unknown; died about AD; St Ninian is the first Apostle of Christianity in Scotland. The earliest account of him is in Bede (Hist. Eccles., III, 4): “the southern Picts received the true faith by the preaching of Bishop Ninias, a most reverend and holy man of the British nation, who had been regularly instructed at Rome in the faith and .

    St. Ninian of Galloway, Bishop, Missionary to Scotland (Nynia, Ninias, Rigna, Trignan, Ninnidh, Ringan, Ninus, Dinan) He was a Celt, born in southern Scotland in about , and is regarded as the first major preacher of the Gospel to the people living in Britain north of the Wall--that is, living outside the territory that had been under Roman.   St. Ninian, bishop of Whithorn (Candida Casa) () (Celtic & British). Venerable Edith, nun, of Wilton, England () (Celtic & British). Venerable Cyprian of Serbia (Serbia). The Scripture Readings. Luke He Is Risen.

    ST. NINIAN'S DAY Today's liturgical memorial in Scotland is the holy bishop St. Ninian. The feast is also observed in a good part of Nova Scotia, as he is the cathedral patron in the Diocese of Antigonish. This handsome church is also much-frequented by Catholic students of the nearby St. Francis Xavier University.   Not a saint but a spelling mistake Sacred Mysteries: Christopher Howse finds that St Ninian, a popular Scottish patron, is an impostor .


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St. Ninian, bishop of Candida Casa by Mark Pattison Download PDF EPUB FB2

Ninian’s shrine at Whithorn drew many pilgrims, among them King James IV of Scotland, who was a regular visitor. The Roman Catholic diocese of Galloway retains Candida Casa as its official name. This article was most recently revised and updated by. Candida Casa was the name given to the church established by St Ninian in Whithorn, Galloway, southern Scotland, in the mid fifth century name derives from Latin: casa (meaning hut) and candidus/candida (meaning shining or glittering white), referring possibly to the stone used to construct it, or the whitewash used to paint it.

History. Whithorn, an early trading center. Saint Ninian probably lived from about to Little is known for sure about his background, origins and early life. It is said, however, that he was British in origin, and that he studied Christianity in Rome, being given the mission of converting the Picts by Pope of the day, Pope Siricius or St Siricius.

In this book he said that Ninian was ‘a most reverend bishop and holy man of the nation of Britons’ who had been trained in Rome.

The Episcopal see was named after St Martin and his church was known as Candida Casa because it was built from stone in. At about the time of Martin's death inNinian built a church at Galloway, in southwest Scotland. It was built of stone and plastered white, an unusual construction in a land where almost all buildings were wood.

He called it Candida Casa (White House) or Whithorn, presumably after Martin's foundation at Tours. Book of Hours of the Virgin Mary and St. Ninian I was looking at Bede’s description of Ninian and Whithorn (Candida Casa) for today’s feast of St Ninan. What strikes me today is Bede’s claim that Whithorn is exceptional because it was a stone church and that Britons didn’t build stone churches.

The Candida Casa was established by St Ninian, who was British in origin but had studied in Rome. Very little St.

Ninian really known about St Ninian. All we have is a short passage in Bede's Ecclesiastical History written some three centuries or 15 generations later. In his church, commonly called Candida Casa, he was buried, and there also several of his coadjutors found their last resting-place (Eccles.

Hist. iii. Meagre as are these details, they may be regarded as forming a trustworthy tradition of the outstanding facts of Ninian's career. His prayer book contained the collect from St Ninian’s Mass.

Renovations in the abbey have uncovered some stones dressed in white. Are these the remains of the famous Candida Casa or white house that Ninian is said to have built and which gives the town itself its name (Whithorn from the anglo-saxon Hwit Aern).

At about the time of Martin’s death inNinian built a church at Galloway, in southwest Scotland. It was built of stone and plastered white, an unusual construction in a land where almost all buildings were wood. He called it Candida Casa (White House) or Whithorn, presumably after Martin’s foundation at Tours.

Archaeologists have. Ninian is also called Nynia, Ninias, Rigna, Trignan, Ninnidh, Ringan, Ninus, or Dinan. He was a Celt, born in southern Scotland in aboutand is regarded as the first major preacher of the Gospel to the people living in Britain north of the Wall--that is, living outside the territory that had been under Roman rule.

Ninian, or Ninyas, Bishop and Confessor T HIS saint, who became the apostle of the southern Picts, was son to a prince among the Cumbrian Britons, who inhabited Cumberland and Galloway. From his cradle it seemed his only delight to visit churches, to discourse on heavenly things, and to be employed in exercises of devotion and piety.

Celts to the Creche: Day December St. Ninian of Whithorn cc AD (or perhaps later) On this 30th Day of Celts to the Creche, we join on this pilgrimage to Bethlehem with fifth century British Bishop St.

Ninian (Ninias) of Whithorn. He is considered to be the first apostle to Scotland. Ninian. Quite the same Wikipedia. Just better. The Southern Picts, for whom Ninian is held to be the apostle, are the Picts south of the mountains known as the Mounth, which cross Scotland north of the Firths of Clyde and they had once been Christian is known from a 5th-century mention of them by Saint Patrick in his Letter to Coroticus, where he refers to them as.

16th September- The Feast Day of St Ninian. He built a church in stone that became known as ‘Candida Casa’- ‘the White House’ (Whithorn)- and was dedicated to St Martin of Tours.

Ninian was buried there and in time the church passed into the hands of the kingdom of Northumbria, to which Bede belonged. such as keeping the rain.

Ninian visited Martin on his way back to Scotland. And secondly, Ninian established a monastery called Candida Casa [Whithorn] in Galloway, South West Scotland, and from there ventured forth into Cumberland and southern Scotland north of the Roman Wall, establishing churches and monastic cells.

He died around CE. The texts also refer to his meeting St Martin at Tours and the resulting construction of Candida Casa (the word “Whithorn” means likewise: shining house), his white-walled church. The traditional date for the commencement of Ninian’s work is AD, which is the date of the death of St Martin, to whom Ninian dedicated his church.

Ninian is also called Nynia, Ninias, Rigna, Trignan, Ninnidh, Ringan, Ninus, or Dinan. He was a Celt, born in southern Scotland in aboutand is regarded as the first major preacher of the Gospel to the people living in Britain north of the Wall—that is, living outside the territory that had been under Roman rule.

He is said to have studied in Rome (note that he is contemporary with. Ninian, Bishop of Whithorn, first missionary to Scotland, and Apostle to the Picts (d. A.D.) He is shown here carrying a Gospel book, bishop's crozier, and his bell (the Clogrinny) used for summoning monks to pra y the divine office.

His vestments are modelled on the clothes in the Book of Kells, and the geometric lettering is based on the incipit from the Lindisfarne Gospels. Tradition holds that Ninian was a Briton who had studied in Rome, that he established an episcopal see at the Candida Casa in Whithorn, that he named the see for Saint Martin of Tours, that he converted the southern Picts to Christianity, and that he is buried at Whithorn.

Variations of the story add that he had actually met Saint Martin, that. Here endeth the first chapter. Setting out with the expressed hope of finding the site of St.

Ninian’s Candida Casa [White House], to that search I have added the desire to place the study of early church fabrics on a broader basis than I found it. But a second chapter is still required, and for that the spade is more fitting than the pen.

He states, however, that while engaged in building his church at Candida Casa, Ninian heard of the death of St. Martin and decided to dedicate the building to him. Now St. Martin died aboutso that the mission of Ninian to the southern Picts must have begun towards the end of the fourth century.

St.volume 3 - Six degrees of whiteness: Finbarr, Finnian, Finnian, Ninian, Candida Casa and Hwiterne Pamela O’Neill Abstract In the Spring issue of The Innes Review, Thomas Owen Clancy presented a compelling argument for the identification of Saint Ninian of Whithorn, Saint Finnian of.